Tag Archives: websites

U.S. Order To Shut Down Christian Websites

Published by:

A shocking report authored by the office of Russia’s top religious leader Patriarch Kirill I [photo top left] states that this past week the United States ordered over 10 million Christian websites destroyed that they claimed were a “threat” to their National Security and that the American Internet giant Google quickly responded by making them all disappear.

According to this report, Google first came under assault from the US government in June when the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that they had launched an investigation into the company, a move defended against by top Google executive Amit Singhal who aside from claiming the attacks against them were baseless said, “At Google, we’ve always focused on putting the user first.”

After weeks of unrelenting pressure upon them, however, this past week Google, which had refused to answer the baseless charges against them, caved to the US government and announced that their Chairman, Eric Schmidt, who had previously said the charges against them were nonsense, agreed to testify before a US Senate Committee under threat of subpoena.

On the very same day that Google caved into these US governments demands, this report continues, they then announced that they had blacklisted and banned over 11 million websites that had been registered for free through the co.cc subdomain the world over.  Giving as its reason for this largest in history removal of private websites Google asserted that it had the right to pull the plug on sites if they “see a very large fraction of sites on a specific freehost be spammy or low-quality.”     

Co.cc is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Cocos (Keeling) Islands, an Australian territory. It is administered by VeriSign through a subsidiary company eNIC, which promotes it for international registration as “the next .com”; .cc was originally assigned in October 1997 to eNIC Corporation of Seattle WA by the IANA.

 Read More

Air Force Blocking NYT & Other Major Publications Due To Wikileaks

Published by:

By SPENCER E. ANTE And JULIAN E. BARNES

The U.S. Air Force is blocking its personnel from using work computers to view the websites of the New York Times and other major publications that have posted classified diplomatic cables, people familiar with the matter said.

Air Force users who try to view the websites of the New York Times, Britain’s Guardian, Spain’s El Pais, France’s Le Monde or German magazine Der Spiegel instead get a page that says, “ACCESS DENIED. Internet Usage is Logged & Monitored,” according to a screen shot reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. The notice warns that anyone who accesses unauthorized sites from military computers could be punished.

The Air Force said it had blocked more than 25 websites that contained the documents, originally obtained by the website WikiLeaks and published starting late last month, in order to keep classified material off unclassified computer systems.

Major Toni Tones, a spokeswoman for Air Force Space Command, wouldn’t name the websites but said they might include media sites. Removing such material after it ends up on a computer could require “unnecessary time and resources,” Major Tones said.

“It is unfortunate that the U.S. Air Force has chosen not to allow its personnel access to the most important news, analysis and commentary,” a New York Times spokeswoman said.

The other publications couldn’t immediately be reached for comment.

The move was ordered by the 24th Air Force, which is responsible for maintaining Air Force computer networks. The Army, Navy and Marines aren’t blocking the sites, and the Defense Department hasn’t told the services to do so, according to spokespeople for the services and the Pentagon.

The Office of the Secretary of Defense has issued guidance against visiting WikiLeaks or downloading documents posted there, according to defense officials. The Air Force told its own personnel in August to avoid those actions. Service commanders have authority to go beyond Pentagon guidance and issue orders to protect classified information.

One senior defense official questioned the wisdom of blocking the newspaper sites or even prohibiting service members from visiting them on military computers, arguing that the information has spread on the Internet and that sites like the New York Times contain other, useful information. The defense official said blocking the New York Times was a misinterpretation of military guidance to avoid visiting websites that post classified material.

The new order doesn’t prevent Air Force personnel from viewing the media websites on nonmilitary computers, one Air Force official said. The block can also be lifted if accessing one of the news sites is essential to a person’s job, according to the screen shot.

View Source Article